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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

3 edition of Political opinion in Massachusetts during Civil War and Reconstruction found in the catalog.

Political opinion in Massachusetts during Civil War and Reconstruction

Edith E. Ware

Political opinion in Massachusetts during Civil War and Reconstruction

by Edith E. Ware

  • 107 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Columbia University; [etc., etc.] in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Massachusetts
    • Subjects:
    • Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877),
    • Massachusetts -- Politics and government -- 1861-1865,
    • Massachusetts -- Politics and government -- 1865-1950

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Edith Ellen Ware ...
      SeriesStudies in history, economics, and public law,, no. 175
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsH31 .C7 vol. 74, no. 2
      The Physical Object
      Pagination219 p.
      Number of Pages219
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6595776M
      LC Control Number17007467
      OCLC/WorldCa2502677

      The Republican Party, also referred to as the "GOP" (Grand Old Party), is one of the world's oldest extant political parties. It is the second-oldest existing political party in the United States ; its chief rival, the Democratic Party, is the earliest. Republican Party Founded Ma () Headquarters First Street SE, Washington, D.C., Ideology Conservatism. These differences go back as far as debates among black abolitionists before the Civil War. Then, as now, black politics was of Massachusetts. Well over a century ago, during the turbulent era.

      Well before the end of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln began formulating a plan to restore the Confederate states to the Union. His Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction (December ) provided that if at least ten percent of a state's voters in the election accepted emancipation and took an oath of allegiance to the United States, then the state could form a new government. The Civil War () governor of Georgia, Joseph E. Brown was one of the most successful politicians in the state's history and the father of two-term governor Joseph M. Brown. Born in South Carolina on Ap , and raised in the mountains of north Georgia, Joseph Emerson Brown capped off a solid middle-class education in private.

        During the Reconstruction era that followed the American Civil War, the reunification of the nation and major gains in equality for African Americans progressed even as . Union Leagues, fraternal groups founded in the North that promoted loyalty to the Union and the Republican Party during the Civil War, expanded into the South after the war and were transformed into political clubs that served both political and civic functions. As centers of the black communities in the South, the leagues became vehicles for.


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Political opinion in Massachusetts during Civil War and Reconstruction by Edith E. Ware Download PDF EPUB FB2

Political opinion in Massachusetts during Civil War and Reconstruction. New York, Columbia University; [etc.] (OCoLC) Online version: Ware, Edith E. (Edith Ellen), b. Political opinion in Massachusetts during Civil War and Reconstruction.

New York, Columbia University; [etc.] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book. Genre/Form: History: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Ware, Edith E. (Edith Ellen), Political opinion in Massachusetts during Civil War and Reconstruction.

Political opinion in Massachusetts during the civil war and reconstruction Political opinion in Massachusetts during the civil war and reconstruction by Ware, Edith E. (Edith Ellen), b. Sloan Foundation Contributor The Library of Congress Language English.

Notes. The gutters are tight throughout the book. Addeddate Pages:   Book digitized by Google from the library of the New York Public Library and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Political opinion in Massachusetts during the civil war and reconstruction Political opinion in Massachusetts during the civil war and reconstruction by Ware, Edith E. (Edith Ellen), b.

Pages:   During that complex period after the Civil War, African Americans gained political power yet faced the backlash of white supremacy and racial violence. I share the concerns many writers, historians, and other scholars are raising about the shortcomings of what children traditionally learn about Reconstruction in : Zenobia Jeffries Warfield.

The first comprehensive collection of legal history documents from the Civil War and Reconstruction, this volume shows the profound legal changes that occurred during the Civil War era and highlights how law, society, and politics inextricably mixed and set American legal development on particular paths that were not predetermined.

Editor Christian G. Samito has carefully selected excerpts. Reconstruction, the period in American history that followed the Civil War, was an era filled with great hope and expectations, but it proved far too short to ensure a successful transition from.

The last chapter of Foner’s book turns to a story well-known to historians and constitutional lawyers: The Supreme Court reshaped the compromises struck by the Reconstruction.

The Fall of the House of Dixie: The Civil War and the Social Revolution that Transformed the South. New York: Random House, McCurry, Stephanie. Confederate Reckoning: Power and Politics in the Civil War South. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, Neely, Jr., Mark E. The Union Divided: Party Conflict in the Civil War North.

During the Civil War, women’s rights movements had been pushed to the side. However, with the ending of the war and the start of Reconstruction, women began to advocate for their rights, and especially so for women’s Susan B.

Anthony and Elizabeth Cody Stanton, women's rights activists, organized a meeting of "The Loyal Women of the Nation" located in New York. Massachusetts played a major role in the causes of the American Civil War, particularly with regard to the political ramifications of the antislavery abolitionist movement.

Antislavery activists in Massachusetts sought to influence public opinion and applied moral and political pressure on the United States Congress to abolish slavery. William Lloyd Garrison (), of Boston began.

FONER: Reconstruction is usually dated aswhen the Civil War ends, towhen the last federal troops are removed from the South or, strictly speaking, from political. Public Opinion in Massachusetts during the Civil War and Reconstruction.

By Edith Ellen Ware. (Columbia University Studies in History, Economics, and Public Law. ) - Volume 11 Issue 3. THE RISE AND FALL OF THE AMERICAN WHIG PARTY: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of the Civil War, RECONSTRUCTION Michael Fitzgerald. URBAN EMANCIPATION: Popular Politics in Reconstruction Mobile,William C.

Harris. WITH CHARITY FOR ALL: Lincoln and the Restoration of the Union, Mark Wahlgren Summers. Thaddeus Stevens, U.S. Radical Republican congressional leader during Reconstruction (–77) who battled for freedmen’s rights and insisted on stern requirements for readmission of Southern states into the Union after the Civil War (–65).

Admitted to the Maryland bar, he moved to Pennsylvania. Notes. A search of JSTOR entries in the American History Review and Journal of American History under the keywords “Reconstruction” and “politics” reinforces the impression of a decline in historical work on the conventional politics of Reconstruction, that is, ones focused exclusively on legislatures and voting.

See James Shepard Pike, The Prostrate State: South Carolina under Negro. The holdings of the United States Army Military History Institute are especially well-represented in studies of Civil War soldiers, and for good reason: a page, single-spaced inventory of its Civil War Document Collection (comprised mostly of soldiers’ letters and diaries) details only a portion of the Institute’s Civil War manuscript.

Reconstruction During the Civil War. The Civil War, in the words of President Abraham Lincoln, brought to America "a new birth of freedom." And during the war began the nation's efforts to come to terms with the destruction of slavery and to define the meaning of freedom.

By the war's end it was already clear that Reconstruction would bring far. Changes in Law and Society during the Civil War and Reconstruction A Legal History Documentary Reader Add to Cart. Edited by Christian G.

Samito. $ E-book (Other formats: Paperback) x24 illustrations 06/22/   Foner’s book is indispensible, but dense. A pithier primer can be found in Michael W. Fitzgerald’s “Splendid Failure: Postwar Reconstruction in. Much like the War ofthe American Civil War was yet another war that did not take place in Massachusetts yet it still greatly affected Massachusetts during the 19th century.

Although no Civil War battles occurred in Massachusetts, many Massachusetts soldiers and military leaders fought and died in the war and many Massachusetts residents helped in the war effort. Mark A. Noll As recently asa distinguished historian in an important book on Reconstruction opined that “there were no really significant developments in American religion.”[1] John Hope Franklin made a great contribution to reinterpreting the Reconstruction era in general, but not with this woefully inadequate statement.

In fact, it would be more accurate Read More Read More. Reconstruction refers to the period immediately after the Civil War from to when several United States administrations sought to reconstruct society in the former Confederate states in particular by establishing and protecting the legal rights of the newly freed black population.